Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint

Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint

Solve your content management problems efficiently with Microsoft SharePoint Meet the challenges of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) head on, using rich ECM features in SharePoint 2013. Led by two ECM experts, you’ll learn how to build a solid information architecture (IA) for managing documents, knowledge, web content, digital assets, records, and user-generated content throughout your organization. With examples and case studies based on the authors’ real-world experience, this practica

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 Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint

2 Comments

  1. Dennis Brooke "Writer, speaker" | |
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    “Fantastic” SharePoint, December 14, 2013
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    This review is from: Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint (Paperback)

    This book is an introduction to Enterprise Content Management (ECM) with Microsoft SharePoint 2013 with emphasis on governance. The book is well-written and easy to read but gives oversimplified view of using SharePoint as ECM as I will go through. The book is not an introduction to SharePoint and actually assumes solid SharePoint knowledge. For instance, on page 15 already is written “…the use of proper metadata in content types instead of folders allows a user to slice and dice contents on any number of combinations…” To understand sentences like that, I recommend to first read one or two books about SharePoint before this one.
    On page 38 the authors mention that Name and Title are the only user editable metadata default fields. The issue in SharePoint is that you can’t rename a document when you use groups with “Contribute – without delete” permission levels, the permission level to be used in many ECM systems to comply with many regulations. The severe implication of this is not discussed and then, of course, neither how it can be solved. One way to work around that is to have an identity from a formal document identification series as name for documents (and documents “without a title” can have their previous name copied to a title field). Then you run into the next issue: The SharePoint document ID system is discussed on a single page without any hints about its limitations and how to implement multiples document identification series that works across several site collections in a farm.
    In depth discussions are missing of approve workflow requirements and where SharePoint fails to support a correct formal approve process; a nasty SharePoint “feature” never talked about.
    Quick Parts is never mentioned and hence there is no information at all about all the issues you run into using Quick Parts. (You that you will get a lot of “strange” issues in a larger ECM application using Quick Parts.)
    Information about search set up is minimal. It is mentioned that SharePoint 2013 supports search on PDF documents; only one other SharePoint 2013 book I have read gives that little vital piece of information. Neither in this book nor in any other book I have read is mentioned why the search results don’t show the title of Word documents. Isn’t the title of the document, the author and, if used, the unique document ID what you would like to see when doing a document search in an ECM?
    In summary, the authors write on page 219 “…that ECM and records management features in SharePoint are fantastic.” The authors hesitations about SharePoints cabilities only appears in the section about system integrators on pages 256 and 257 and in the final thoughts on page 261: “.. it might take several subject matter experts who are familiar with various aspects of SharePoint facilitates to learn what is needed for your ECM solution.”
    The second line in the introduction mentions that “When you have completed reading the book, you will have the comfort level to know how to implement ECM inside of SharePoint and to understand why you are doing so.” As should be obvious from my review, I’m not convinced about that, but it is still a readable book.

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  2. SJK | |
    3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great for SharePoint Projects AND Beyond, November 25, 2013
    By 
    Dennis Brooke “Writer, speaker” (Auburn, WA USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint (Paperback)

    Experienced managers know that the best software package doesn’t always lead to a successful system–good planning and taking into account cultural considerations are what result in a great implementation. In fact, studies show that most SharePoint projects fail not because of the software, but because of poor implementation.
    ECM with MS SharePoint goes beyond the “how to” of configuring SharePoint and shares practical guidance on how to ensure that a system is well designed and has strong user adoption. As a result it has advice you can use in content management projects on platforms other than SharePoint.
    This guide is practical and has a great balance between planning, implementation, and end user adoption. Learn from the real world experience of White and Riley and avoid costly mistakes. Get the most out of your content management software.

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